Cow vs Kaaba – the missing spine of ‘liberals’ when it comes to Islam

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When a man was killed in Dadri on suspicion of cow slaughter and beef consumption, it elicited, and rightly so, concern and outrage from many. The leading outragers were those who self-identify as “liberals”.

Apart from absolving the state government and taking selfies outside the house of the murdered man, these liberals decided to attack the belief that supposedly was the central reason why the man was killed – the belief that cow is a sacred animal which shouldn’t be slaughtered for food.

In fact, they decided to attack the cow itself, even as they desperately tried to paint every crime as cow related violence. Continue reading

The shaved head of Sonu Nigam mourns the death of ‘secularism’ in India

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In Hindu tradition, one shaves his head when there is a death in the family. Sonu Nigam shaved his head today, because the so-called secular-liberal beliefs of India died today.

“Secularism” in India was anyway a cancer. It kept mutating different parts of the body and it was only a matter of time when it resulted in the death of the host body. It happened today.

What started as a naively idealistic “equal respect and rights to all religions” definition of secularism was bastardized into “more respect and special rights to minority religions” by our political class, but it died today when it was turned into “no disrespect to minority religions at any cost” by the so-called intellectual class.

The case of Sonu Nigam proves it beyond doubt. Continue reading

Did polarization of Hindu votes take place in Uttar Pradesh?

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I was invited to Zee News for discussing assembly election results and there I had the opportunity to talk to Arif Mohammad Khan, who once was a state minister and an active politician, famous for being the Muslim face who quit Congress when Rajiv Gandhi, then enjoying a mammoth majority in Lok Sabha, took steps to overturn the Shah Bano judgment to please Muslim fundamentalists.

As trends appeared to settle down and it looked like BJP was all set to win Uttar Pradesh (and it has swept the elections like the 2014 Lok Sabha elections as I write), some people started talking about kabristan-shamshan and “polarization”. Continue reading

This TV ad explains the importance of ‘appearing’ liberal

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This thought had struck me more than a year ago, when I saw this particular television advertisement. Then the ad slowly disappeared from TV screens. However, I saw it again during the recent India-England cricket series. So hitting a mauke pe chauka, I thought to pen my thoughts finally.

First, take a look at the ad: Continue reading

A short passage on ‘introspection’ from a ‘right winger’ to ‘liberals’

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“The meaning of nationalism has been reduced to a joke by fans of this regime. Anyone criticising the government is branded anti-national. This is a dangerous trend that can’t be good for healthy democracy at all.”

So said a self-declared liberal person. And it’s not a new grouse. This has been being repeated ever since the JNU incident came to light in the beginning of this year, where the government unwittingly made a lout like Kanhaiya Kumar a hero for the self-declared liberals. Continue reading

Why the so-called liberals forced Paytm to take off an ad

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In India, more than being a liberal – where you are willing to accommodate dissenting voices – it is important to appear a liberal – where you shout every hour that you’re liberal and thus drown out the dissenting voices.

This shouting is a form of virtue signalling that helps people with otherwise sad credentials to aspire for respectability in a particular social circle.

And a lot of so-called liberals indulged in collective shouting yesterday after mobile wallet brand Paytm released an ad that hurt their guilty conscience. Continue reading

This is why bodies like Muslim Personal Law Board oppose Uniform Civil Code

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One of the oft-repeated arguments put forward against Uniform Civil Code (UCC) is that this is against the fundamental right to practice one’s religion. It is argued that the act of the state to legislate in matters, which ought to be governed through religious texts, is an attack on religious freedom.

Outwardly it might appear so, but in practice, UCC doesn’t take away any religious freedom. Yes, it takes away the rights of religious bodies to control a group – and that’s why those who fancy themselves as representatives or leaders of a religion are opposing it – but it doesn’t strip an individual his freedom to follow certain religious practices or rules. Continue reading

The problem with ‘reforms must come from within among minorities’ argument

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Last week, the government took a stand in the Supreme Court against triple talaq, arguing that such practices were regressive and needed reconsideration. Around the same time, the Law Commission of India issued an appeal (pdf link) seeking public consultation on the issue of Uniform Civil Code (UCC). Continue reading